LOPEZ GARCIA, A., REYES MARTINEZ, A., Apuntes para una historiografía de la Arqueología en la ciudad de Guadix (Granada). Entre los mitos y la realidad, in Colecciones, arqueólogos, instituciones y yacimientos en la España de los siglos XVII

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  The History of archaeological research has only recently become a research topic of interest within Spain. A congress, Colecciones, arqueólogos, instituciones y yacimientos en la España de los Siglos XVIII al XX, was held at the Universidad
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     A   c   c   e   s   s   A   r   c    h   a   e   o    l   o   g   y     A     r   c    h  a e o   p  r    e    s      s        A        c    c   e   s    s     A     r      c     h       a       e        o           l       o       g       y   A COLECCIONES, ARQUEÓLOGOS, INSTITUCIONES Y YACIMIENTOS EN LA ESPAÑA DE LOS SIGLOS XVIII AL XX Editores Sergio España-ChamorroRebeca Arranz SantosAlberto Romero Molero   Archaeopress Publishing Ltd Summertown Pavilion 18-24 Middle Way SummertownOxford OX2 7LGwww.archaeopress.comISBN 978 1 78491 863 7ISBN 978 1 78491 864 4 (e-Pdf) © Archaeopress and the individual authors 2018 All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the copyright owners.  Índice Prólogo ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….1   Jorge García Sánchez La colección de antigüedades romanas de la Real Academia de la Historia: el proceso de formación ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………5   Paloma Martín-Esperanza Montilla Historia y Arqueología en el siglo XVIII en el Reino de Murcia: el descubrimiento de la antigüedad del Puerto de las Águilas…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 13 Pedro Pérez Mulero Del lugar donde fue Iliberri    (Granada): historiografía de un debate…………………………………………… 43 Amparo Sánchez Moreno Apuntes para una historiografía de la Arqueología en la ciudad de Guadix (Granada). Entre los mitos y la realidad ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..61   Antonio López García y Antonio Reyes Martínez La Arqueología en la prensa nacional: el caso de  La Ilustración Española y Americana ………………… 75 Rebeca Arranz Santos La formación arqueológica y en historia del arte del joven Manuel Gómez-Moreno Martínez (1870-1899) ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 109  Alfredo Mederos Martín  Ángel de los Ríos y los inicios de la A rqueología medieval en el norte de la Península Ibérica…… ..127 Enrique Gutiérrez Cuenca Pedro de Madrazo y la Arqueología española del siglo XIX …………………………………………….………… .145 Alegra García García Pioneros de la Arqueología alicantina. La necrópolis de l’Albufereta………………………………………… 154 Enric Verdú Parra De la exhumación de las estructuras a los estudios arquitectónicos. Nuevas aportaciones historiográficas a la edilicia de Carteia …………………………………………………………………………………… ..182 Alberto Romero Molero La Rota protohistórica como ejemplo de la evolución del concepto de Tarteso………………………… .195 Álvaro Gómez Peña  iii La Arqueología en Córdoba en la década de 1950. Un recorrido historiográfico a través de sus   protagonistas………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… .208 Francisco José Rueda Olmo El estudio de la cerámica numantina durante el primer tercio del siglo XX………………………………… 238 Álvaro Sánchez Climent  About Access Archaeology  Access Archaeology offers a different publishing model for specialist academic material that might traditionally prove commercially unviable, perhaps due to its sheer extent or volume of colour content, or simply due to its relatively niche eld of interest. All  Access Archaeology  publications are available in open-access e-pdf format and in (on-demand) print format. The open-access model supports dissemination in areas of the world where budgets are more severely limited, and also allows individual academics from all over the world the chance to access the material privately, rather than relying solely on their university or public library. Print copies, nevertheless, remain available to individuals and institutions who need or prefer them.The material is professionally refereed, but not peer reviewed. Copy-editing takes place prior to submission of the work for publication and is the responsibility of the author. Academics who are able to supply print-ready material are not charged any fee to publish (including making the material available in open-access). In some instances the material is type-set in-house and in these cases a small charge is passed on for layout work. This model works for us as a publisher because we are able to publish specialist work with relatively little editorial investment. Our core effort goes into promoting the material, both in open-access and print, where  Access Archaeology  books get the same level of attention as our core peer-reviewed imprint by being included in marketing e-alerts, print catalogues, displays at academic conferences and more, supported by professional distribution worldwide.Open-access allows for greater dissemination of the academic work than traditional print models, even lithographic printing, could ever hope to support. It is common for a new open-access e-pdf to be downloaded several hundred times in its rst month since appearing on our website. Print sales of such specialist material would take years to match this gure, if indeed it ever would.By printing ‘on-demand’, meanwhile, (or, as is generally the case, maintaining minimum stock quantities as small as two), we are able to ensure orders for print copies can be fullled without having to invest in great quantities of stock in advance. The quality of such printing has moved forward radically, even in the last few years, vastly increasing the delity of images (highly important in archaeology) and making colour printing more economical.  Access Archaeology  is a vehicle that allows us to publish useful research, be it a PhD thesis, a catalogue of archaeological material or data, in a model that does not cost more than the income it generates. This model may well evolve over time, but its ambition will always remain to publish archaeological material that would prove commercially unviable in traditional publishing models, without passing the expense on to the academic (author or reader).     A     r   c    h  a e o   p  r    e    s      s        A        c    c   e   s    s     A     r      c     h       a       e        o           l       o       g       y   A
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